The mecca, California opens at The Lodge March 17

The mecca, California

Saturday, March 17th – Saturday, April 7th, 2018

Opening Saturday, March 17th, 6-9pm

Eastern Star Gallery in partnership with The Lodge

www.thelodge.la

The Eastern Star Gallery of the Archer School for Girls and The Lodge are pleased to present The mecca, California, an installation exploring the relationship between enlightenment, spirituality, and humanism in Southern California.

For years, dreamers have traveled west to Southern California in search of its magic. California promises direction, empowerment, and great spiritual illumination: those who journey here embrace the beauty of the now and the opportunity to find, or lose themselves. California’s free spirited aura creates the sense that anything is possible and that limitless hope drives us to pursue new horizons. The sun is at the forefront of life in California, shining brilliantly and reawakening the collective Californian spirit. Waves of change have propelled California’s history forward through vast and visionary ideas. Although Los Angeles is always moving through the environments of beach, freeway and desert, it was a sleepy town in the 1960s and 70s. California comes alive through the four elements of earth, air, fire, and water, and artists have been moved in varying modes and degrees by all four over time.

This show includes the work of 15 California artists including Chad Attie, Alexandra Grant, Shane Guffogg, Tim Hawkinson, Bettina Hubby, Soo Kim, Alice Könitz, Friedrich Kunath, Johnston Marklee, Fawn Rogers, Ed Ruscha, Allison Schulnik, Samantha Thomas, Richard Louderback, and Eric Yahnker.

The Offing: “Antigone 3000”

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The Offing magazine features:

“Antigone 3000” — Introduction by Kate Durbin

http://theoffingmag.com/enumerate/antigone-3000/

The character of Antigone, an enduring  symbol of uprising and resistance to the state and society, has shape-shifted from a tragic mythical figure to a contemporary emblem of the risks and consequences of standing up for what you believe in a hostile world. She has been re-envisioned by Mexican poet Sara Uribe in Antigóna Gonzalez (Les Figues Press, translated by Les John Pluecker) and Jean Anouilh’s Nazi resistance direction of Antigone. Her hold on the collective imagination has not waned.

While the play itself is central to Los Angeles painter Alexandra Grant’s Antigone 3000, this new series of abstract paintings delves beyond the language of Sophocles into the play’s subterranean depths.

Inspired by Rorschach’s psychological tests, which are designed to reveal the viewer’s subconscious beliefs, Grant sees her paintings as “half-Rorschachs,” or stains. The stain is perhaps a perfect representation for Antigone, this figure who never vanishes from a collective history, who keeps reappearing  in different forms, wearing different faces, fighting for different causes.

Antigone is a stain we cannot seem to remove, a stain that appears like all stains, completely inconveniently, serving as a reminder of inconvenient truths  like love. Love, the force that builds worlds, has been centered in Grant’s work before, including in the grantLOVE project, which helped fund the Love House Project in Watts. It was Antigone’s claim to Kreon that she  “was born to love, not to hate” that incited Grant’s Antigone 3000. It is Antigone’s love that demands she honor her dead; it is love that leads, ultimately, to her death.

When a person is shot in a movie, often there is a moment of total stillness, after which a bloom of red appears on their clothing. Their mouth falls open. Trembling, they touch the red. They are amazed. In that moment, I like to imagine that they are realizing two things simultaneously: that they are alive,  oh so alive, more alive than they’ve ever been in their whole dead life. And that, before any of us are able to grasp the significance of that revelation, we die.

What are we born for? Not to hate, but to love.

Kate Durbin

Image: Antigone 3000 (4), 2014, oil on linen, 90” x 80”. Photo by Brian Forrest.

The Offing: “I’ll Be Your Mirror”

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The Offing magazine features:

“I’ll Be Your Mirror” — Collaboration, Reflection, and Rorschach in the Work of Alexandra Grant

http://theoffingmag.com/enumerate/ill-be-your-mirror/

Image: she taking her space (after Michael Joyce’s “he taking the space of”), 2004, The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles